Skip Navigation
Skip to Main Content

 

The Examination Process

You must pass an examination to be considered for a career service position. The purpose of the examination is to produce a list of eligible candidates to fill one or more positions. MDOT develops and administers a variety of examination types, such as:

Written Tests
(e.g., multiple choice, short answer, matching)

These exams may include multiple-choice , true/false, short answer, essay and matching test items. The most frequently used is a multiple choice exam in which test-takers select the one most correct answer from the choices presented.

Some tests have been automated to allow for testing on a personal computer. Taking a test on a computer does not usually require prior computer experience. Detailed instructions and assistance from a testing monitor are provided to test-takers. One example of computerized testing used by MDOT is the Clerical Careers Examination (CCE).

Unassembled Exams
This is a structured method for evaluating an applicant's job related training and experience. Applicants are rated on the basis of the information they provide on the employment application. This method credits education, training, work experience and/or accomplishments that demonstrate possession of job-related knowledge, skills and abilities. A rating is completed using pre-established job-related criteria applied consistently to all applicants who meet the minimum qualification requirements.

Qualification Supplements
Similar to above, this is a structured method for evaluating an applicant's job related training and experience. The major difference is the addition of a type of employment questionnaire which is mailed to applicants who meet the minimum qualification requirements. Applicants are rated on the basis of the information they provide on the supplemental form or questionnaire.

Oral Examination
Applicants respond to a set of structured questions typically used to assess an applicant's qualifications, job-related skills and worker requirements. Questions may take a number of different formats to gain information regarding qualifications (education, training or experience), worker requirements (willingness to work under certain conditions, shifts, overtime), job knowledge, job samples (write a memo, give a presentation), situational (work scenarios), or past behavior (give an example of when you solved a critical problem).

Performance Exam 
Applicants perform one or more tasks typical of the job class for which they are applying such as typing, transcribing shorthand, writing a letter to convey information or a decision, delivering a speech or presentation, and proofreading a correspondence. Performance exams are best used to measure specific demonstrable skills and are typically used to test hands-on ability to perform the tasks of a job.

Assessment Center
This method uses a variety of testing techniques to obtain a complete picture of a candidate's ability to perform a job. These techniques may include interviews, writing tests or writing samples, role-playing exercises, job simulation exercises, presentation or group discussions. It is most typically used as an assessment technique for supervisory or management positions.