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TOD Partners & Resources

(MDOT TOD Main Page)

Local Governments, Community Partners, & Stakeholders:

MDOT actively partners with the local land use authorities of the state including a broad range of municipalities, and county governments to explore needs and opportunities associated with land use and transit infrastructure. Most of Maryland's existing and planned station areas are in existing communities, where the interest is first and foremost to ensure that transit facilities support  and enhance neighborhood access and potential.  Existing neighborhood residents, employers and employees are of paramount importance in any consideration for station area improvements in support of TOD.  In addition, many advocacy groups and non-profit organizations are actively working throughout Maryland to contribute to the creation of healthy communities supported by TOD.  MDOT partners with many of these groups to explore tools for supporting TOD and related transportation alternatives.  Some key players include:

MDOT / WMATA

MDOT Office of Real Estate and Economic Development (ORED)
ORE is working to make more transit area sites available for development or redevelopment. Visit their website for more information on joint development opportunities.
 
MDOT Office of Planning and Capital Programming (OPCP)
OPCP coordinates with local jurisdictions and other state agencies to help ensure that land use policies and programs support TOD outcomes. The office provides technical assistance to local governments including feasibility and pre-development planning studies to promote multimodal access and TOD in the form of staff time and collaboration, and consultant support to conduct planning studies.

Maryland Transit Administration (MTA)
MTA is a key partner in coordinating transit access, parking, and related infrastructure.  MTA is working to plan rail station areas for the future Purple Line in the Washington Metropolitan region, implementing TOD principles.   
 

Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority
Metro encourages transit-oriented development and provides opportunities for real estate partnerships through its Joint Development program.

State Agency Coordination

Maryland Department of Planning - Planning Tools for Transit-Oriented Development

Smart Growth Sub-Cabinet (SGSC):

  • Created to coordinate inter-agency efforts to implement Smart Growth.  
  • Provides input and assistance with TOD projects. 
  • Reviews and approves proposed boundaries for Sustainable Community designations
  • Includes cabinet level appointees from:
    MDA | MHEC | MEA | MDP | MDE | DLLR | DBM | DHCD | NCSG | DGS | DNR | DHMH | MDOT

Local Governments, Community Partners and Stakeholders:

MDOT actively partners with the local land use authorities of the state including a broad range of municipalities, and county governments to explore needs and opportunities associated with land use and transit infrastructure. Most of Maryland's existing and planned station areas are in existing communities, where the interest is first and foremost to ensure that transit facilities support  and enhance neighborhood access and potential.  Existing neighborhood residents, employers and employees are of paramount importance in any consideration for station area improvements in support of TOD.  In addition, many advocacy groups and non-profit organizations are actively working throughout Maryland to contribute to the creation of healthy communities supported by TOD.  MDOT partners with many of these groups to explore tools for supporting TOD and related transportation alternatives.  Some key players include:

The Central Maryland Transportation Alliance (CMTA) - Formed by a coalition of Central Maryland business and nonprofit leaders dedicated to improving travel efficency within the region. 

Coalition for Smarter Growth –  advocates for policy and planning decisions regarding transportation and development to ensure that decisions accommodate growth while revitalizing communities, providing more housing and travel choices, and conserving our natural and historic areas.

University of Maryland Transportation Policy National Center for Smart Growth and Research Group – Explores new approaches to transportation, such as land use and network efficiency issues including TOD, to help identify transportation solutions that increase mobility and accessibility, support economic and environmental  sustainability, and promote sound urban development.
 
1,000 Friends of Maryland –  Advocates for “Smart Growth”- committed to preserving natural resources; maintaining and revitalizing existing Maryland communities; protecting historic resources and integrating them into the life of the community; assuring efficient, effective transportation choices for all citizens and supporting development which takes into account the public's interest.

Urban Land Institute (ULI) – Explores issues of urbanization, conservation, regeneration, land use, capital formation, and sustainable development, as the preeminent, multidisciplinary real estate forum.

Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs):

MPOs are federally mandated transportation policy making organizations for urban areas which have more than 50,000 people. In recent years, MPOs have taken leadership roles in TOD, by coordinating growth and transit plans. MPOs can work with transit agencies to support the planning and implementation of TOD through station area plans and parking strategies, capital improvements and funding for infrastructure that supports station access. The MPOs active in TOD planning in Maryland include:

Baltimore Region Transportation Board (BRTB)
The BRTB is the MPO for the Baltimore region, as coordinated by the Baltimore Metropolitan Council (BMC). MDOT partners with the BRTB to identify needs and opportunities for station area development and improvements in the Baltimore Area.  A good example of recent collaboration is the current regional planning effort which has received funding from HUD's Sustainable Communities Initiative. 

National Capital Region Transportation Planning Board (TPB)
The TPB is the MPO for the Washington region, as coordinated by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (MWCOG).  MDOT coordinates closely with TPB, member jurisdictions and WMATA in supporting initiatives to improve linkages between transportation and land use throughout the region, most notably through the Transportation-Land Use Connections (TLC) Program. 

Wilmington Area Planning Council (WILMAPCO)
WILMAPCO is the MPO for New Castle County, Delaware and Cecil County, Maryland. WILMAPCO has been working with several local jurisdictions to strategize towards creating land use patterns that could support the longer term expansion of transit service.  
 

Private Investors:

Transit-Oriented Developments are not purely public investments. Private investors that share a vision of TOD are essential in order to plan, design, construct and finance mixed use real-estate developments that align with the unique zoning and community design ideas of TOD. Two primary private investor groups include:

Development Groups – Private developers and community development corporations are key players in transforming TOD concepts into built projects with real benefits on the ground.   Private developers partner with the public sector during the planning, designing and building process and many TOD projects are joint ventures between the public and private sector.

Equity Partners – financial partners are critical in securing construction loans, infrastructure finance and other necessary financial support to make TOD plans become a reality.

Best Practices:

In Maryland, it is fully recognized that TOD will be different in every context it is pursued.  Existing development patterns, transportation infrastructure needs, and economic outlook all have a profound effect on strategies to promote transit-oriented development in a given area. The mix of development, its density and how it is designed, for example will vary considerably based on location. To learn more, read The New Transit Town: Best Practices in Transit-Oriented Development, which discusses TOD in different types of settings, as described below.

  • Downtown Business District – Bethesda Metro Station is densely developed with a variety of retail, office and residential options.
     
  • Suburban Town Center – In Silver Spring, employers such as Discovery have built large office buildings around the Metro station, and retail, restaurant, housing and entertainment businesses have followed.
     
  • Commuter Town Center – A community connected to the downtown core by transit might see TOD take the form of a “Main Street” center, with retail, professional offices and multifamily housing (Owings Mills, Frederick MARC Station).

Other Recommended Resources:

Maryland's Interactive Transit Station Area Profile Online Map Tool

Center for Transit-Oriented Development

Central Maryland TOD Strategy: A Regional Action Plan for Transit Centered Communities

Reconnecting America