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The Telework Partnership with Employers - Report Summary

 

TELEWORKING IN THE WASHINGTON METROPOLITAN REGION

In September 1996 and September 1998, COG conducted telephone household surveys to obtain information on teleworking in the Washington metropolitan region. More than 1,000 households were interviewed for each survey. The survey calling area included the District of Columbia; Frederick County, Maryland; Montgomery County, Maryland; Prince George's County, Maryland; Calvert County, Maryland; Charles County, Maryland; Loudoun County, Virginia; Fairfax County, Virginia; Prince William County, Virginia; Stafford County, Virginia; and Arlington County, Virginia. Teleworkers were defined as "wage and salary employees who at least occasionally work at home or a local telework center during their normal work hours."

Key findings are listed below:

  • In 1996, approximately 151,000 employees (6.8 percent of the region's workforce) teleworked. This includes all frequencies, from occasionally to several days per week. By 1998, the number of teleworkers had risen to 250,000 (12 percent of the region's workforce), an increase of 65 percent.
  • 59,000 employees (2.6 percent of the region's workforce) telework two or more days per week.
  • Approximately 18 percent of non-teleworkers indicated they would be interested in teleworking and that parts of their job could be done at a location other than the office. Based on this information, COG estimates that there are approximately 382,000 potential teleworkers in the region.
  • 92 percent of teleworkers reported working at home and one percent working at a telework center. Two percent reported that they work at home and at a telework center. Five percent reported working at a location other than their home or a telework center, such as a local library.
  • 73 percent of teleworkers reported driving alone as their primary means of getting to work. 15 percent reported that rail was their primary mode and eight percent reported that the bus was their primary mode. Two percent of teleworkers reported that walking was their primary mode and two percent reported that biking was their primary mode. None of the teleworkers interviewed reported carpooling or vanpooling as their primary mode of travel to work.
  • 51 percent of teleworkers reported one-way commute lengths of 10 miles or less. 18 percent reported commutes of 11 to 20 miles and 24 percent reported commutes of 21 miles or greater. 
  • 26 percent of teleworkers reported one-way commute times of 15 minutes or less. 43 percent reported one-way commute times of 16 to 30 minutes, and 27 percent reported one-way commutes of 31 minutes or greater. 
  • 14 percent of telecommuters reported having been with the employers for less than one year. 48 percent reported having been with their employer for one to five years. 20 percent reported having been with their employer for between five and ten years and 18 percent reported having been with their employer for more than 10 years. 
 

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